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Gifts For Babies: 15 “Awww-Worthy” Presents

November 12, 2014

gift-guide-baby-post (2)

We know that whether you’re a parent-to-be, a cool aunt, or a favorite grandma — you want your #1 baby to feel every ounce of love you have for them this holiday season. We created a list of 15 of our favorite baby gift items from UncommonGoods that are baby-safe, unique, and most certainly awww-worthy. Warning: After reading this gift guide you will feel a sudden need to squeeze the nearest baby.

Gifts for Babies: 15 "Awww" Worthy Gifts

1. Boo-boos be gone! Let your adventurous baby run free with these protective, adorable Crawling Knee Pads.

 

Gifts for Babies: 15 "Awww" Worthy Gifts

2. Gnome-one is as cute as your tiny tot. Gnome-one. |  Gnome Babysuit & Hat

Gifts for Babies: 15 "Awww" Worthy Gifts

3. From A to Z, let the world know which letters are your favorite. |  Personalized Baby Stroller Blanket

Gifts for Babies: 15 "Awww" Worthy Gifts

4. Gift this charming coat of arms to your little prince or princess. Caution: They may demand that you to hang it above their throne. | Coat of Arms – Personalized Birth Announcement

Gifts for Babies: 15 "Awww" Worthy Gifts

5. Eeeeek, watch out! These Baby Shark Slippers are on their way to pull on your heart strings!

Gifts for Babies: 15 "Awww" Worthy Gifts

6. A new year equals new memories. Get inspired and start saving those sweet, little moments with our 2015 Birth Year Box!

 

Gifts for Babies: 15 "Awww" Worthy Gifts

7. Silver spoons are a thing of the past. Introduce this fancy rattle for the fanciest baby you know! | Silver Baby Rattle

Gifts for Babies: 15 "Awww" Worthy Gifts

 

8. Yes, you’ll always certainly be their hero. But that doesn’t mean you can’t let them be their very own hero with this legendary storybook cover! | Personalized Storybook Art

Gifts for Babies: 15 "Awww" Worthy Gifts

9. Are you constantly guessing whether your family, friends, or restaurants will have a highchair available? With this harness, you can keep your bundle of joy snug as bug on any chair, any time! | Portachair Harness

Gifts for Babies: 15 "Awww" Worthy Gifts

10. Save those precious memories that make your baby, your baby, with this adorable Custom Petit Collage Baby Book!

Gifts for Babies: 15 "Awww" Worthy Gifts

11. All wrapped up, and no where to go. #NomNomNom | Tortilla Baby

Gifts for Babies: 15 "Awww" Worthy Gifts

12. Treasure those little items you know you’ll never want to let go inside this urban inspired Personalized Townhouse Baby Keepsake Box!

 

 

Gifts for Babies: 15 "Awww" Worthy Gifts

 

13. Because your baby deserves panda hugs when you’re not around. | Bear Hug Baby Set

Gifts for Babies: 15 "Awww" Worthy Gifts

 

14. Shake, rattle, and roll out the sweet fun! Introduce ice cream to your baby without the sticky mess (or unwanted cravings). | Ice Cream Rattles

Gifts for Babies: 15 "Awww" Worthy Gifts

15. Gift good fortune for every step your baby takes, literally. Take-out never looked so cute! | Baby Fortune Cookie Booties

gift-guide-baby-cta

 

Maker Stories

Woodworking Winner: Glenn Goes Against The Grain

October 7, 2014

Design Challenge Winner | Woodworing Design Challenge | UncommonGoods  
It’s no secret that we love wood designs here at UncommonGoods, and so do our customers. And because our first Woodworking Design Challenge was such a success with over 100 entries, we decided to host another one earlier this year! Once again, we weren’t disappointed with the heavy amount of amazing entries we received, Glenn Heimgartner’s submission being one of them.

When sifting through the woodworking entries, I knew that Glenn’s Wooden Wrap Lamp (at the time named the Audrey Lamp) would make it as one the semifinalists. Through just a single photo, I recognized Glenn’s solid craftmanship and fell in love with the lamp’s beautiful and simple design. When we finally saw the lamp in person, from the maple veneers to the black walnut base, my prediction of a well-designed, handmade product was proven correct. I secretly wanted to take the lamp into my own apartment and place it permanently on my bedside table.

Meet Glenn – a sustainable woodworker, soccer coach, father of three (who allegedly runs faster than a cheetah), and our latest Woodworking Design Challenge winner! 

Wooden Wrap Lamp
Can you tell us three fun, random facts about yourself?  
1. I went to 4 different high schools in 4 years – including one in Japan.

2. I completed a 30-day expedition in the Yukon – no showers, no laundry for 30 days –undoubtedly one of the most amazing experiences of my life.

3. According to my 6-year-old son and his buddies, I run faster than a cheetah.

How did you come up with the concept of your Wooden Wrap Lamp design? 
I had just finished a long stretch of building large, rather in-depth custom furniture pieces and was interested in changing gears and making something of a smaller scale that was more of a functional accent piece.  Also, I had a large amount of walnut scraps that I wanted to upcycle instead of discard. I had been thinking about the idea of a lamp for a while and figured this was the perfect time, as I needed a holiday gift for a family member.

I had seen other lamps with the general construction of a solid wood base, 4 posts, and a top and always liked the look and feel of light shining through wood veneer shades.  What resulted was the first version of the wooden wrap lamp, which is a blend of modern, arts and crafts, and Japanese design details with a natural, handcrafted feel.

Design Challenge Winner | UncommonGoods

How did you discover our Woodworking Design Challenge? 
We’ve been getting the UncommonGoods catalog for years and my wife showed me the announcement for the challenge in the Winter Catalog – A WEEK BEFORE THE SUBMISSION WAS DUE.  She urged me to submit and I figured since I just made a wooden lamp as a gift for a family member that it would be a good fit for UncommonGoods.  Luckily I was able to set other work aside and get a refined version designed, built, and shipped on time.

How did you celebrate when you found out that you won our Woodworking Design Challenge?
Can’t say I did anything too crazy.  I think I might have given my wife a high-five and then enjoyed a good beer.  Was just honored and excited to know that others out there believed I created something of value.

Design Challenge Winner | Woodworking Design Challenge | UncommonGoods

What different techniques do you use when creating your designs?
For me it’s simple, I start with an idea that needs to meet an aesthetic need and perform a function.  I do most of my design in my head – from the initial concept through fabrication – never stopping the internal struggle until the piece is complete.  I sketch on paper and draft in 3D to explore proportions and details and to solidify my focus.  I usually have a 3D plan to take to the shop and start fabrication.

Once I start to create actual parts, I trust my eye and will deviate from the plan, tweaking various details – thicknesses, proportions, radii of curves, etc. – to arrive at a more finished product.  The piece is completed and sometimes it hits that comfortable balance between form and function – sometimes it doesn’t.  If multiples will be made, I refine and rebuild.  If it is ‘one-off’ custom piece, it is what it is at that point.

Design Challenge Winner | Woodworking Design Challenge | UncommonGoods

Can you walk us through the step-by-step process of creating your lamp?
I go through current inventory of walnut and purchase additional if need be.  I ‘upcycle’ scraps from larger projects when possible.  The selected walnut is milled into various pieces that make up the solid wood frame (2 base pieces, 4 posts, and 2 top pieces per lamp).  Details on the ends of these base and top pieces are shaped via the router and by hand.  Joinery is cut via basic machines and cleaned up via hand tools (base and top pieces are joined via lap joints; posts are joined to the base via mortise and tenons and to the top via bridle joint).

Pieces are glued to make the base and top respectively.  Posts are glued to the base.  Maple veneer is cut and glued in ring shapes to make the shades.  All pieces are sanded and finished.  Rings are glued to posts.  Top is glued to the posts.  Final quality control and touch up finishing is completed.  Nickel hardware and electrical components are installed and light bulb is tested.  Product is packaged.

Are there any major projects, collaborations, or ideas you’re working on now that you want to talk about?
First and foremost, I’m in full production mode in the shop handcrafting multiple lamps to meet UncommonGoods demands for the Winter Catalog!  On the custom furniture front, I’m working with a few private clients designing various unique, functional pieces for residential settings (dining room table, library table, bench for a foyer, etc.).  I’m also in the process of designing and prototyping two more home accent pieces for retail that will be of the same style and materials as the wrap lamp.

Design Challenge Winner | UncommonGoods
Other than making and promoting your woodwork, what other hobbies are you into?
With three amazing small children (ages 6, 4, and 1), I don’t have too much free time for hobbies.  Luckily, my passion of woodworking satisfies most of my self-centered needs.  When I do get a free second, I love the outdoors and exploring the nearby mountains on my own or with others. (I usually do a great one-hour hike right from my shop a few days a week.)  I coach my oldest son’s soccer team and help my parents with their small farm.  I’m fortunate to live in a town that has a great music scene and I see live acts whenever possible.

Design Challenge Winner | Woodworking Design Challenge | UncommonGoods

Where do you get your wood from and is it sustainable?
I have a professional background in sustainable forestry and sustainable wood products, so I am well versed on the land management techniques and supply chain logistics of such material and goods.  I take pride in sourcing responsibly harvested wood from local forests and I purchase from local mills and small sawyers whenever possible.  I mainly work in walnut, cherry, and maple, which readily grow in the forests of my area.

I also have worked in reclaimed chestnut, pine, and oak, which are usually recycled from demolished buildings.  I work to minimize waste in project planning and ‘upcycle’ scraps from larger projects like tables into smaller projects like the wrap lamp.  Shavings are spread on tree/shrub beds that surround the shop and are also composted.

Design Challenge Winner | UncommonGoods

What makes wood products special?
Wood is always alive, whether it is upright in the form of a tree or milled as a beautifully wide-planked tabletop.  I am constantly fascinated by the idea that a tree can function as part of a forest (cleaning the air and water, providing wildlife habitat, and providing an amazing backdrop for outdoor recreation) and then be sustainably harvested to continue its life in functional and beautiful items such as furniture and home goods.

I love that a log can be milled in different ways (rift sawn, flat sawn, quartersawn) to result in different grain patterns and that every piece is different, exhibiting unique details like curly grain, pronounced figure, knots or worm holes.  I always get excited to finish mill a rough piece to see what amazing grain is exposed.  It never gets old smelling and handling this material on a daily basis.

Maker Resources

5 Tips On How To Conquer Trade Shows

September 19, 2014

Whether you’re planning to go to your first trade show soon or you’re a trade show pro – check out the five detailed tips below on how to take advantage of these events to help your business prosper!

5 Trade Show Tips | UncommonGoods

1. Make connections with other vendors: Networking at a trade show is no big secret. Essentially, that’s the whole point of trade shows! But be sure to not only get the attention from prospective companies you’d like to see your products represented by, but also that of other vendors. It’s important to make connections with like-minded small businesses, and yes, even your competitors. Many vendors are happy to tip others off about interesting events, great contacts, or must-see websites to check out — and it’s always beneficial to see how other businesses work and to take a peek at their products in person.  You might even be inspired to collaborate in some way or join forces together!

5 Trade Show Tips | UncommonGoods

During downtime, make an effort to introduce yourself to the booths and tables next to you – and if you can – venture to other category areas to spark different ideas. If you do make a great connection with another vendor, show appreciation by letting them know about the great tips that you have hidden up your sleeve! #SharingIsCaring

2. Join social events before and/or after the trade show: Being present at the big trade show is, of course, crucial. But sometimes you can make stronger and more natural connections with others in a more intimate setting. (Mix and mingle parties, lunch or dinner dates, or networking events/conferences.) People tend to open up more when there’s food and drinks involved and when a more carefree vibe has settled in. You can find interesting events by asking other contacts, actually reading the newsletters you’re subscribed to, checking out meetup.com, or using the power of Google.

5 Trade Show Tips | UncommonGoods

5 Tradeshow Tips | UncommonGoods

Extra tip: If you think you have a pretty promising contact list – maybe you can even throw a small gathering yourself! This would illustrate authority on your part and will strengthen the important relationships you already have. Don’t be scared to mix your vendor contacts with your merchant contacts, this will only encourage your invited guests to join.

5 Tradeshow Tips | UncommonGoods

3. Be sure you and anyone helping you knows your collection:   Nothing is worse than asking questions at a booth and having someone who can’t talk about their own line! One thing I’ve learned here at UncommonGoods is that buyers tend to stray away from unorganized or flighty vendors, no matter how great the product is. Know the product name, pricing, materials, and any other important information that someone might ask you right on the spot. If you have any friends or family helping you at your booth, prep them with information about your designs and provide them a cheat sheet if you can. Even if the potential merchant knows that the person helping you isn’t the direct designer, they are still a reflection of your business.

5 Trade Show Tips | UncommonGoods

Extra tip: Be sure to give out information beyond pricing to beef up anyone’s interest.  What makes your product special? Is it where it was made, how it was made, or who made it? Does it give a cut of its proceeds to a certain charity? Are there multiple uses of your designs? Think outside the box, because this is how a buyer will pitch any of their potential items to their team. The more powerful and interesting the story is, the better. Sure, the buyer can dig through your website to find this information you’ve probably already beautifully explained in detail. But I still suggest to hook them on the spot when you can, because there’s no guarantee they’ll visit your website once they float off to the next booth. (Even if you give them a business card!)

5 Trade Show Tips | UncommonGoods

4. Show appreciation and send follow-ups on social media platforms: The reality of trade shows is that merchants, buyers, and companies are looking at hundreds of booths for hours, days, and for some – the entire week! Your goal? Have them remember yours! Even if your product is amazing, it’s hard to stand out against hundreds of other innovative products. Besides following this display advice, you have to do more than just depend on your great products and hope that you’ll receive an email in the next few days. Take charge of the contacts you’ve made not only with a follow-up email, but also with giving them a shout out on social media a few days later, something short and sweet with a bit of personality will do.

Example: @prospectivebuyer – It was great meeting you and I’m so happy you enjoyed our new line. Let me know if you’d like me to send a sample! 

When you and the potential contact are saying your goodbyes at your booth, ask if they are on Twitter, Instagram, or LinkedIn and write down their personal handle name so you know the message will go directly to them. If you’re feeling bold, ask to snap a photo with them (or them wearing/holding your designs) and share that photo when you send your tweet or post. Not only will this jog their memory of who you are, but that prospective buyer will feel extra special.

5 Tradeshow Tips | UncommonGoods

Extra tip: Be sure that your feed has some type of recent activity before contacting anyone. Post a few photos, retweet/post a couple of articles, and write out personable comments. A “dead” social media platform won’t exactly work in your favor.

5 Trade Show Tips | UncommonGoods

5. Project energy and be positive: We all know trade show days are long! A constant smile on your face and an upbeat personality at all times might not be super realistic, but keep in mind that carrying positive energy is vital. It’ll make your day a lot more bearable and you’ll be more on your toes and alert. Think of it like you’re hosting a party – invite the buyers and your contacts, welcome them into your space, and keep them engaged! Also, remember to be supportive of your fellow artists and designers. Buyers love it when designers suggest other booths to check out, it shows a collaborative spirit and buyers have told me that it makes them love you even more. (And it’s good Karma!)

5 Trade Show Tips | UncommonGoods

Design

What Does Photography Mean to These 3 Photographers?

September 18, 2014

Photography Challenge | UncommonGoods

We’re excited to say that the eight semifinalists are chosen for our very first Photography Challenge! Cast in your votes and comment on the photos you think deserves to win $500 and should be added into our uncommon assortment! Keep in mind that you’re able to vote for more than one photo.  The four top voted photographs will be judged by our four wonderful guest judges, and they will decide on the grand prize winner!

Because this is a new type of contest for us, we wanted to get inside the heads of our guest judges and speak about the exciting world of photography. The guest judging panel are three professional photographers and our art buyer: Ashley Davis, Mark Weinberg, Emily Dryden, and Katy Loeb. We decided to throw a few questions at them and, and with no surprise, they threw some amazing responses right back! Check out the Q+A below and let us know what photography means to you in the comments section.

 

Photography Challenge | Guest Judge | UncommonGoods

Ashley Davis | Photographer  

“I love that I can get behind my lens, take a photograph, and turn it into something magical for people to love and want to have for their own.”

If money was no object, what type of photography project would you like to organize?
I work with physically and mentally disabled children, so I would love to run a program where we’d be able to purchase a few cameras for these kids and teach them the beauty of photography. Although these children have faced a lot of adversity in their young lives, they mostly have such an incredible outlook on life and I know that would show through in their artwork.

Which website should every photographer know about?
CreativeMarket.com. It is run by creatives, for creatives. Whether you want to sell your stock images on the site for a little extra cash, or browse and purchase their immense photography resources such as overlays, presets, WordPress and website templates, and fonts – they have got what you need!

What do you love about photography?
I love that I can get behind my lens, take a photograph, and turn it into something magical for people to love and want to have for their own. What I love about photography in general is that there is the freedom to express oneself in so many different ways, and that there is such a broad definition of “photography” these days and the genres continue to expand. I am constantly finding new artists that I am falling in love with, and although the market is somewhat saturated, I don’t see that as a necessarily bad thing, but as a blessing that there is more talent to find and an occasion to rise to the challenge of standing out among the crowd of many as one of the greats.

 

Photography Challenge | Guest Judge | UncommonGoods

Mark Weinberg | Photographer

What makes a powerful photo? “Light.”

Who is your all-time favorite photographer?
I don’t have one. Here are a few: Michael Kenna for his ability to capture ordinary environments in a surreal way, Edward Burtynsky for his ability to find patterns in both man-made as well as natural environments, Henri Cartier-Bresson for his ability to capture a moment on film.

 If money was no object, what type of photography project would you like to organize?
I would love to do a large scale documentation of the US Postal System. Both the buildings and the employees. The architecture in post offices ranges from some of the most beautiful structures every completed in the USA to some of the most utilitarian. I’d love to interview employees and photograph them as well. I’d love hear what everyday life is like as well as the craziest thing they have ever seen in the mail.

What makes a powerful photo?
Light.

Photography Challenge | Guest Judge | UncommonGoods

 Emily Dryden | Photographer at UncommonGoods

   “[Images] should be able to draw the viewer into a different world or into a new story or emotion.”

What makes a powerful photo?
A powerful image is one that can keep you engaged the longest. The image should be able to draw the viewer into a different world or into a new story or emotion.

Which website should every photographer know about?
Aphotoeditor.com is a great website to discover new work and the learn about the business.

If you were able to take a photo of anything or anyone anywhere– what would you decide on?
I would like to shoot David Lynch have coffee in an old diner.

katy
Katy Loeb | Art Buyer for UncommonGoods

“[Photography] plays with memory, reality, and technology in a way that other mediums do not.”

What’s your favorite photograph?
This is a tough question! One of my very favorites would have to be Carrie Mae Weems’s series The Kitchen Table (1990), in which the artist records a fraction of the many activities, conversations, and emotions that make their way across her kitchen table.  Weems captures the complexity and nostalgia of such an ordinary space with reverence.

 What type of photographs are you hoping to add into your assortment?
My goal is to bring in a range of photography that will be both aesthetically pleasing in a home, but also evoke strong emotions from a viewer. I’m always attracted to works that could be conversation starters!

What does photography mean to you?
Photography, I believe, is perhaps the most nuanced form of visual art.  It plays with memory, reality, and technology in a way that other mediums do not. In that vein, photography for me has the power to evoke more powerful emotions and ideas than most other art forms.

Be sure to cast in your votes here for your favorite photographs that made it as semifinalists! The deadline for voting is at 11:59pm on September 23, 2014. The top 4 voted photos will move onto the next round and the guest judges will decide on one grand prize winner.  The winner will earn $500 and have a chance to be added into our assortment!

Photography Voting | UncommonGoods

Maker Stories

Over The Moon With Natasha’s Winning Design

September 17, 2014

Natasha Justice | UncommonGoods

I immediately knew Natasha’s design of the Crescent Necklace would be a semi-finalist for the Jewelry Design Challenge the moment I opened up her entry. The charming piece matched perfectly with the UncommonGoods brand – not only was it a beautiful ceramic piece, but it was handmade with a unique mosaic design. The only problem we ran into, since Natasha offered multiple hues for her designs, was deciding on which color to feature!  The judges were unanimous when deciding on the winner and I was happy to make that phone call to the very excited and humbled Natasha. We wanted to bring a necklace into our assortment that was a classy statement piece, a pendant that would be hard for anyone not to notice, but not overwhelming or too showy. The Crescent Necklace was a perfect match. And because we couldn’t resist ourselves, we also threw in her matching earrings. Meet Natasha Justice, our latest Jewelry Design Challenge winner, and learn about her step-by-step process of making her Crescent Necklaces.

Natasha Justice | UncommonGoods

How did you come up with the concept of your design for your Crescent Necklace?
I love to mix different shapes and textures.  I had some pieces from a broken necklace that sparked my curiosity.  I pushed each of the pieces into my rolled out slab of clay and really liked what I saw.  I was wanting  a bold piece, so I used my large oval to sort of frame the textured design I just created.  And the shape and design jumped out at me.  I made another cut to create the crescent shape and loved the completed piece.

Natasha Justice | UncommonGoods

How did you celebrate when you found out that you won our jewelry design challenge?
I immediately called my husband, I couldn’t believe it!  I was so excited!  And we went to dinner that night to celebrate.

How did you discover our jewelry design challenge?
I heard about it through another artist and looked into it on UncommonGoods. I always tell myself to just go for it, you never know, you could win.

Can you tell us 3 fun facts about yourself?
1. I am seriously addicted to crime shows and movies.  I love Criminal Minds and any type of crime thriller movie.

2. I started making jewelry when I was 10 and then [again] after getting laid off. When I found out I was pregnant with my first son (I have 3) I decided I needed a hobby to keep myself busy. So I started making more jewelry and my hobby became my business.

3. I can’t sew but I would absolutely love to learn how.

Natasha Justice | UncommonGoods

What different techniques do you use when creating your designs?
I mostly use hand-building techniques to create my clay pieces.

What’s one piece of jewelry you own that you would never want to lose?
One of my very first ceramic pendants I made.  It reminds me why I started making ceramic pendants and my love for clay.

Natasha Justice | UncommonGoods
Natasha’s hometown, Cincinnati.

Can you walk us through the step by step process of creating your necklace?
I take a clump of clay and roll it out flat with a rolling pin.  I then take the broken necklace pieces and stamp out the design.  I cut the design out with my large oval cutter and then I use a small circle to complete the crescent shape.  I smooth all of the edges, make the holes in the top and sign each ceramic piece on the back.  Then each piece has to dry out completely between two weighted pieces of wood to ensure the clay pieces do not curl.  Once they are dry I put them through the first firing, which is the bisque firing.  My kiln reaches 1,940 degrees.  I let the pieces cool and then they are ready to be glazed.  I hand-glaze each piece with a paint brush.  I load my kiln again and let the kiln reach 1,830 degrees.  After the pieces cool they are ready to be made into jewelry.  I buy my chain, jump rings, and lobster claw clasps in bulk so I have to measure each piece of chain to the appropriate length and hand cut each one.  I then assemble the necklace into a completed piece.

Natasha Justice | UncommonGoods

Other than making and promoting your jewelry, what other hobbies are you into?
I love watching movies and I recently got back into working out consistently. [These hobbies] seem to help me wind down.

Natasha Justice | UncommonGoods

Natasha Justice | UncommonGoods

Do you think jewelry pieces should be fashionable or timeless?
I think a girl needs a little bit of both.  I love timeless pieces, but I always have to have some fashionable ones as well.  The fashionable ones are my go-to when I go on dates with my husband or out with the girls. I also love to mix them both with layering.

Necklace up close