Browsing Tag

Photography

Maker Stories

This Just In-spiration: Meet Marci Lundy

June 29, 2015

Our makers never fail to motivate us, encourage our creativity, and fill us with inspiration. So, when a new product enters our assortment, we’re always excited to learn more about the person behind it.

What gets an artist going and keeps them creating is certainly worth sharing, and every great connection starts with a simple introduction. Meet Marci Lundy, maker of the Pikake Flower Mask and Poppy Soap Gift Set.

Marci Lundy | UncommonGoods

What first inspired you to make face and body products?

I moved to Colorado in the Spring of 2010. Although undeniably beautiful, the state left my skin undeniably dry. My usual skincare regimen that I practiced while living at sea level in Southern California no longer worked. I have always admired the look and feel of skincare products, and one day I decided to get online and research the process of making body butters, scrubs, and soaps. I was thrilled to learn about the process and started making my own soaps and scrubs. The products were not perfect in the beginning, but I felt so proud knowing that it was possible to create these items that I have always loved, sans all of the harsh ingredients. Personal use of 303 Face + Body products started with me, and then I began to make products for my family and friends. I used the feedback to fine tune products that I made, and the more I researched, the better the quality of the product became. I went from making soap and sugar scrubs to now making gel moisturizers and serum for nails.

Pikake Flower Mask and Poppy Soap Gift Set | UncommonGoods

What experiences have been most instrumental in shaping your life so far?

I’m not so sure that there is a particular experience that was instrumental, but for as long as I can remember I’ve literally felt that there is nothing that I cannot do. Having that mindset allows the sky to be my limit. I’ve had people ask, “How did you think to do that?” I find myself answering, “Why wouldn’t I think I could!?!” My husband is also an amazing motivator, both through encouraging me and by simply “being.” An avid swimmer, he was in a diving accident when he was fourteen, and has been in a wheelchair for thirty years. He is so amazing, so positive, heavy into community outreach, and working with the Mayor of Denver. I also have a very supportive family. They’ve been wonderful supporters since day one. With all of that positivity around me, its virtually impossible to not feel as though it’s possible to do whatever I want to in this life.

 What advice would you give to the you of 5 years ago?

Find your center, and start using your gifts. I am a total kid at heart, and I’ve just recently learned how to “manage this,” if you will. For years, I lived life as it happened, very much into enjoying the moment. There is nothing wrong with that, but there has to be a vision, a plan, a passion for something that you’re striving toward. I had passion for many things, but never really made any of them work for me. In the last few years, I’ve learned how to not only have fun with what I consider my gifts, but figure out how to make a living doing that which I enjoy and love. Photography and creating my products are my “happy place.” I’ve incorporated my photography into my work by creating greeting cards with my photography. It’s all wonderfully rewarding.

What was the most exciting thing about starting your own company? 

It was very liberating to have the freedom to create something that helps others feel their best. I remember working at my desk years ago, looking out the window and thinking, “I wish I was out there, able to do what I really enjoy.” It’s so exhilarating to wake up (or barely sleep, for that matter) because your mind is so excited to start working on your latest skincare product.

Marci Lundy | UncommonGoods

What does your typical day at work look like?

The crisp, morning air inspires me, and each morning I go photo walking, which for me is exercise + motivation through nature + capturing nature. After a smoothie or a nice cuppa joe, I begin thumbing through skincare magazines, looking for common skincare concerns, also finding myself motivated by the way various skincare ads are photographed. My studio is also the loft that I share with my husband, so I’ll get my products together and test out textures (sugar scrubs with shea butters, etc) and from those moments of exploration, new products tend to be born. I also use my workdays to reach out to people to possibly collaborate with. The networking process is ongoing, and in this age of social media its very easy to make wonderful connections.

Is there a trinket, talisman, or other inspirational object you keep near? If so, what is it and what does it mean to you?

I love crystals, and have various crystals around my creative space. I love the energy that I receive from them, very uplifting.

What quote or mantra keeps you motivated? 

I happened across a quote a few years back that read, “Never Try, Never Know.” I’m always going to try, because I never want the feeling of not knowing.

Pikake Flower Mask and Poppy Soap Gift Set | UncommonGoods

What are your most essential ingredients and elements of your process?

Activated charcoal and aloe vera gel are two of my most beloved ingredients. Both of those are miracle products, seriously. I also love herbs, I live for herbs!

blogcta-seethecollection4

Design

What Does Photography Mean to These 3 Photographers?

September 18, 2014

Photography Challenge | UncommonGoods

We’re excited to say that the eight semifinalists are chosen for our very first Photography Challenge! Cast in your votes and comment on the photos you think deserves to win $500 and should be added into our uncommon assortment! Keep in mind that you’re able to vote for more than one photo.  The four top voted photographs will be judged by our four wonderful guest judges, and they will decide on the grand prize winner!

Because this is a new type of contest for us, we wanted to get inside the heads of our guest judges and speak about the exciting world of photography. The guest judging panel are three professional photographers and our art buyer: Ashley Davis, Mark Weinberg, Emily Dryden, and Katy Loeb. We decided to throw a few questions at them and, and with no surprise, they threw some amazing responses right back! Check out the Q+A below and let us know what photography means to you in the comments section.

 

Photography Challenge | Guest Judge | UncommonGoods

Ashley Davis | Photographer  

“I love that I can get behind my lens, take a photograph, and turn it into something magical for people to love and want to have for their own.”

If money was no object, what type of photography project would you like to organize?
I work with physically and mentally disabled children, so I would love to run a program where we’d be able to purchase a few cameras for these kids and teach them the beauty of photography. Although these children have faced a lot of adversity in their young lives, they mostly have such an incredible outlook on life and I know that would show through in their artwork.

Which website should every photographer know about?
CreativeMarket.com. It is run by creatives, for creatives. Whether you want to sell your stock images on the site for a little extra cash, or browse and purchase their immense photography resources such as overlays, presets, WordPress and website templates, and fonts – they have got what you need!

What do you love about photography?
I love that I can get behind my lens, take a photograph, and turn it into something magical for people to love and want to have for their own. What I love about photography in general is that there is the freedom to express oneself in so many different ways, and that there is such a broad definition of “photography” these days and the genres continue to expand. I am constantly finding new artists that I am falling in love with, and although the market is somewhat saturated, I don’t see that as a necessarily bad thing, but as a blessing that there is more talent to find and an occasion to rise to the challenge of standing out among the crowd of many as one of the greats.

 

Photography Challenge | Guest Judge | UncommonGoods

Mark Weinberg | Photographer

What makes a powerful photo? “Light.”

Who is your all-time favorite photographer?
I don’t have one. Here are a few: Michael Kenna for his ability to capture ordinary environments in a surreal way, Edward Burtynsky for his ability to find patterns in both man-made as well as natural environments, Henri Cartier-Bresson for his ability to capture a moment on film.

 If money was no object, what type of photography project would you like to organize?
I would love to do a large scale documentation of the US Postal System. Both the buildings and the employees. The architecture in post offices ranges from some of the most beautiful structures every completed in the USA to some of the most utilitarian. I’d love to interview employees and photograph them as well. I’d love hear what everyday life is like as well as the craziest thing they have ever seen in the mail.

What makes a powerful photo?
Light.

Photography Challenge | Guest Judge | UncommonGoods

 Emily Dryden | Photographer at UncommonGoods

   “[Images] should be able to draw the viewer into a different world or into a new story or emotion.”

What makes a powerful photo?
A powerful image is one that can keep you engaged the longest. The image should be able to draw the viewer into a different world or into a new story or emotion.

Which website should every photographer know about?
Aphotoeditor.com is a great website to discover new work and the learn about the business.

If you were able to take a photo of anything or anyone anywhere– what would you decide on?
I would like to shoot David Lynch have coffee in an old diner.

katy
Katy Loeb | Art Buyer for UncommonGoods

“[Photography] plays with memory, reality, and technology in a way that other mediums do not.”

What’s your favorite photograph?
This is a tough question! One of my very favorites would have to be Carrie Mae Weems’s series The Kitchen Table (1990), in which the artist records a fraction of the many activities, conversations, and emotions that make their way across her kitchen table.  Weems captures the complexity and nostalgia of such an ordinary space with reverence.

 What type of photographs are you hoping to add into your assortment?
My goal is to bring in a range of photography that will be both aesthetically pleasing in a home, but also evoke strong emotions from a viewer. I’m always attracted to works that could be conversation starters!

What does photography mean to you?
Photography, I believe, is perhaps the most nuanced form of visual art.  It plays with memory, reality, and technology in a way that other mediums do not. In that vein, photography for me has the power to evoke more powerful emotions and ideas than most other art forms.

Be sure to cast in your votes here for your favorite photographs that made it as semifinalists! The deadline for voting is at 11:59pm on September 23, 2014. The top 4 voted photos will move onto the next round and the guest judges will decide on one grand prize winner.  The winner will earn $500 and have a chance to be added into our assortment!

Photography Voting | UncommonGoods

Maker Resources

How to Make It: 5 Product Photography Tips

August 16, 2014

So, you’ve just created an awesome new product and you really want to sell it. Presentation is everything, which makes the photography of your item very important. Because we all don’t have a fully equipped studio on our hands at all times, here are some easy tips that almost anyone can master!

Light It Up

The number one most important factor is lighting. You don’t need a lot of lights; all you really need is a great sunlit window and a white fill card. A fill card is simply anything you use to reflect light, which allows you to fill with light for darker, shadowy areas in a photograph.  Fill cards are traditionally white, made of foam core or poster board, but can also be silver or gold depending on the quality of light you want to reflect.

When picking which window to use, pick one that allows diffused, soft light to shine through. What you don’t want is really harsh sunlight. If the light is too hard, it can make one part of your image too bright in comparison to the rest. What you are looking for is nice, even light.

How to Make It: Product Photography Tips

How to Make It: Product Photography Tips

Setting the Stage

The second step is creating your set. White poster board (or any large piece of white paper) and some tape is a cheap and easy way to get a clean backdrop. Find a small table and place the white background so that the window light comes from the right or the left. Allow the poster board to curve in the back, creating a sweep. Then place your fill card on one side.

How to Make It: Product Photography Tips

How to Make It: Product Photography Tips

Camera Ready

Whether you’re using a high-end camera or a simple point and shoot, the most helpful hint I can suggest is to turn off the flash. If you can’t turn it off, cover it with tape. Then, set your camera’s white balance setting to daylight—or auto if that isn’t available. If your photo shows up with a strange colorcast, you’re probably using the wrong white balance.

White balance is the general hue of your photograph.  For example, you could have a warm balance, where everything looks orange, or a cold balance where everything looks blue.  Most cameras allow you to pick which white balance you want to use.  You do this by picking the white balance that matches your light source.  Extra tip: If you are using natural light, you should pick the icon on your camera that looks like a sun.  If you are using tungsten light, you should pick the icon that looks like a light bulb.

Taking Shots

At UncommonGoods, we crop most of our photos into a square, so when you are composing, make sure you leave enough space around your product to easily crop. You can use almost any basic photo program to do this. I personally like to use Photoshop.

How to Make It: Product Photography Tips

When composing your shot, keep into account that you may not get the whole thing in focus. Your main priority is to make sure the selling feature is in focus. For example, let’s say you are shooting jewelry. If the pendant or charm has interesting detailing, make sure that’s in focus and let the chain go out. Decide which aspect you would most like the potential buyer to see, and then hone in on that.

How to Make It: Product Photography Tips

How to Make It: Product Photography Tips

While composing, use your fill card to fill in the shadows on your product. It’s usually nice to leave some shadow, as it will lend some shape, but you don’t want the shadows to go too dark.

Time to Edit

After you’ve shot the photo, use whatever photo-editing program you have (iPhoto, Photoshop, Lightroom, etc.) When you are done, save it as a high res (meaning 300 dpi) .jpg or .tiff.

In general, my editing advice is to be subtle in your treatment. Some amateur mistakes include using too much contrast, over saturating the colors or using too much sepia tones.  Subtly enhance your photos but don’t make them look unnatural, which is especially important in product photography because you don’t want to misrepresent what you are selling.

And you’re done! Have a good shoot!

Maker Stories

Inside the Artist’s Studio with Barry Rosenthal

June 6, 2014

Barry Rosenthal | UncommonGoods
When our team learned that renowned photographer Barry Rosenthal calls our building, The Brooklyn Army Terminal, home to his studio we couldn’t wait to work with him on a project. Once that project–Pop Top Six Pack Glasses–was ready for our customers’ eyes, I couldn’t wait to tell everyone all about the set. Learning more about Barry’s work and the creative process that lead to the finished product got me, and the blog team, even more excited about having such a talented artist as a neighbor. Knowing that we couldn’t pass up the opportunity to check out his studio space, our own photographer, Emily, and I made the (very) short journey across the BAT atrium to see where Barry assembles his collections of found artifacts and other objects to create captivating photos.

Join us in exploring a new corner of our building by stepping into Barry Rosenthal’s studio, taking a look at some of his unique work, and finding out what goes on behind the scenes when the camera isn’t clicking.

Barry Rosenthal Art | UnommonGoods

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Design

Developed from Photography: Pop Top Six Pack

March 13, 2014

A few months ago, we learned that photographer Barry Rosenthal creates his extraordinary images of everyday objects right here in the Brooklyn Army Terminal—in a studio just a short jaunt from our very own door. As fans of his work, we couldn’t wait to collaborate with him. Then we saw his thought-provoking “Found in Nature” collection, and we knew that we’d found the perfect art for our latest in-house design, the Pop Top Six Pack glasses.

Pop Top Six Pack | UncommonGoods

“I really admire Barry’s work, so it was fun to work with his photo to translate it into a design for glassware. What I love most about this photo is the composition—the way he artfully arranged the pop tops to create a pattern.” —Sarah Stenseng, Senior Product Development Associate

We’re fascinated with Rosenthal’s photographs of found collections, because even though the objects he shoots were once discarded, he presents them as uniquely beautiful treasures. The photos tell stories through their subject matter and composition. By taking bits of the past and bringing them into the present, Rosenthal creates something timeless. Our goal was to translate this timeless quality to a product that can be used every day, but also stands out as something special.

Barry Rosenthal, Pop Tops

The original photograph, Pop Tops, captures an arrangement of meticulously placed pop tabs the artist collected from the parking lot of Orchard Beach in Bronx, NY. It tells the story of the approximately 475 billion aluminum cans produced worldwide each year—cans that don’t easily break down in nature, and can take centuries to decompose.

Some of the tabs pictured date back to the ‘60s and ‘70s, so their unique shapes add unexpected variation to the composition. The tabs also show their age through weathering in Rosenthal’s unaltered piece.

Pop Tops Design Process | UncommonGoods

With Pop Art in mind, our Product Development Team collaborated with Rosenthal to transform Pop Tops into a new design that celebrates his photography and is infused with a bit of our personality. We started by editing the original photo to remove the natural color and accentuate the silhouettes of the tabs. Next, we carefully extended the pattern to fit completely around the can-shaped glass without interfering with the layout as it was intended.

Pantone

After perfecting the pattern, bright colors were added to play up the Pop Art aspect of the design. Each glass in the set of six is a Pantone color chosen to stand out and show off the pop tab print. As a finishing touch, each glass is complete with Barry Rosenthal’s signature.

Barry Rosenthal

We love the way the final product turned out, and we think you’ll love it too. The Pop Art Six Pack is available now, and we’re looking forward to more exciting collaborative projects to come!