Browsing Tag

Product Development

Design

Developed from Photography: Pop Top Six Pack

March 13, 2014

A few months ago, we learned that photographer Barry Rosenthal creates his extraordinary images of everyday objects right here in the Brooklyn Army Terminal—in a studio just a short jaunt from our very own door. As fans of his work, we couldn’t wait to collaborate with him. Then we saw his thought-provoking “Found in Nature” collection, and we knew that we’d found the perfect art for our latest in-house design, the Pop Top Six Pack glasses.

Pop Top Six Pack | UncommonGoods

“I really admire Barry’s work, so it was fun to work with his photo to translate it into a design for glassware. What I love most about this photo is the composition—the way he artfully arranged the pop tops to create a pattern.” —Sarah Stenseng, Senior Product Development Associate

We’re fascinated with Rosenthal’s photographs of found collections, because even though the objects he shoots were once discarded, he presents them as uniquely beautiful treasures. The photos tell stories through their subject matter and composition. By taking bits of the past and bringing them into the present, Rosenthal creates something timeless. Our goal was to translate this timeless quality to a product that can be used every day, but also stands out as something special.

Barry Rosenthal, Pop Tops

The original photograph, Pop Tops, captures an arrangement of meticulously placed pop tabs the artist collected from the parking lot of Orchard Beach in Bronx, NY. It tells the story of the approximately 475 billion aluminum cans produced worldwide each year—cans that don’t easily break down in nature, and can take centuries to decompose.

Some of the tabs pictured date back to the ‘60s and ‘70s, so their unique shapes add unexpected variation to the composition. The tabs also show their age through weathering in Rosenthal’s unaltered piece.

Pop Tops Design Process | UncommonGoods

With Pop Art in mind, our Product Development Team collaborated with Rosenthal to transform Pop Tops into a new design that celebrates his photography and is infused with a bit of our personality. We started by editing the original photo to remove the natural color and accentuate the silhouettes of the tabs. Next, we carefully extended the pattern to fit completely around the can-shaped glass without interfering with the layout as it was intended.

Pantone

After perfecting the pattern, bright colors were added to play up the Pop Art aspect of the design. Each glass in the set of six is a Pantone color chosen to stand out and show off the pop tab print. As a finishing touch, each glass is complete with Barry Rosenthal’s signature.

Barry Rosenthal

We love the way the final product turned out, and we think you’ll love it too. The Pop Art Six Pack is available now, and we’re looking forward to more exciting collaborative projects to come!

 

Design

Jason Snyder & Briana Feola Meld Great Design with Educational Artwork

January 31, 2014

As product developers, we get the chance to work with a number of really amazing, talented artists and designers. Since launching our first uncommon product, we’ve connected with incredibly interesting people and learned a lot about working with the design community. There’s a lot we could tell you about working with designers – but we realize that there’s something we don’t know much about at all – what it’s like for designers working with us.

We wanted to find out more about the artists’ take on collaborating with UncommonGoods, so we asked some! Recently, we had the pleasure of working with Jason Snyder and Briana Feola of Brainstorm to create our new Earth Science Glasses and Coasters featuring their vibrant and retro-feeling Earth, Atmosphere, Ocean, and Space prints. Not only was the design duo happy to answer our questions about the inspiration behind their art, but they also gave us some great insights into working with the UncommonGoods Product Development team.

Jason & Briana

What was your original inspiration for this series?
After leafing through some vintage science books and thinking to ourselves that the information is so important but the graphics are always less than pleasing to look at, the series started with our “Atmosphere” print. It was a short run, maybe 30 prints, and they received a tremendous response online. So we re-printed that and started to expand on the layered, graphic concept to create a series and round out the concept. Over the course of a year, “Earth” was second and “Ocean” came third.

Earth Science Glasses | UncommonGoods

How was your love of science born?
Briana: Science was the other subject that kept my attention growing up, aside from art class. It was always the most fascinating but so complex at the same time. Coupled with some really great teachers over the years, I was completely hooked. It only makes sense that I try and merge my favorite ideas from my early school days.

Jason: I think science in general carries with it such an immense range of interesting (and complicated) topics and that really lends itself well to education if executed the right way. I have an Art Education degree, so combining these awesome sciences with education is really how a lot of my ideas come together. I don’t even know if that answers the question but that’s what I came up with.

Tell us your favorite science joke.
A photon walks in to the airport and the ticket agent asks him, “Are you checking any bags today?” and he says, “No, I’m traveling light.”

Earth Science Glasses | UncommonGoods

What was your initial thought when UncommonGoods’ Product Development Team contacted you?
We were super excited to get involved and we were ready immediately. We had both been following UncommonGoods for a long time and after meeting some of the awesome team members at the 2013 National Stationery Show, we had hoped there would be an opportunity to work together!

Breana Designing

What was the most challenging thing about working with UncommonGoods? What was the most exciting?
There’s a lot of correspondence that has to happen to get a product off the ground. And the amount of time it takes to go from “let’s do this” to “the product is online” is much longer than we were used to, having the ability to produce our screenprints ourselves as soon as they’re ready. We adopted more patience. Easily the most exciting thing is the day our first product arrived in hands. Going from idea to real product is the best!

How does it feel to have your art on these products?
It feels a little bit surreal. Knowing that these glasses are in kitchen cabinets and kids (and adults!) are drinking out of them and learning a thing or two, it’s just fantastic. We can both remember sitting at the kitchen table as kids reading cereal boxes and looking at colorful, pictorial cups. And now we are a part of the culture in a way we can be proud of.

The Uncommon Life

Getting to Your Intersection of Love: A 6 Step Road Map

January 23, 2014

Intersection of Love | UncommonGoods

Valentine’s Day is approaching and, as the old saying goes, love is in the air. We’re extra giddy about celebrating Saint Valentine’s holiday this year thanks to a special collection of fun new art created by our Product Development team. The Intersection of Love ™ is a way to show the world that your one-and-only has a special place in your heart.

On the other hand, Valentine’s Day can be a total bummer for those who are feeling unlucky not in love. And, since our blog team is made up of women at different points in the journey to the intersection of love, we decided to pool our experiences one night over a couple glasses of wine and share our best advice for those looking to arrive at the corner of commitment.

1. Make an itinerary for your journey. Know who you are and what you want.
Some travelers are just looking for friendship, others are looking for marriage, and some want something in between. Before hitting the road, evaluate what you really want. Look at the map of where you’ve already been to evaluate past relationships, then make a note of where you want to be, who you want to be there with you, and what you want to do to find that person.

2. Choose Your Mode of Transportation
Where will you feel comfortable meeting someone? Many people find love online these days. There’s nothing wrong with that, and although it can be scary setting up that online dating profile, once you make the decision to do it it’s a lot easier than you think!

It’s also okay to go the old-fashioned route. Get out there and attend events where you can meet people with similar interests, talk to your friends to see if they’re interested in setting you up, and don’t feel like you have to commit to the same mode of transportation for the whole ride.

3. Read the Road Signs
You’ll come across some important road signs along the way, so it’s important to be able to read those signals. Some things are easy to pick up on (your potential partner stops texting), but others are a bit more subtle. It’s impossible to tell what another person is thinking, so trust your intuition. Spending time with someone is sort of like taking driver’s ed. You’ll learn new things along the way.

4. Check Your Gas Gauge
You don’t want to run out of gas, but that can happen if you leave a lead foot on the accelerator. It’s okay to tap the brake, or even pull over for a bit if you think you’re going too fast. Keep your tank full by making conscious efforts to keep your relationship exciting. Also, take the time to really think about your relationship and if what you’re putting into it (and getting from it) is creating a mutual valuable experience.  If your tank does start to get low, it’s time to evaluate whether it’s working or if it’s just time to move on.

5. Know When to Flip on Cruise Control
So, you have a full tank of gas and you’re feeling pretty comfortable? When your relationship is in a good place, you don’t always have to stress about what’s next. When you get to this point, make time to enjoy just hanging out together (even if you don’t have big plans), get to know each other’s friends and family, and learn little things about each other you didn’t know before. Sometimes it’s fine to relax and take in the scenery.

6. Knowing When You’ve Arrived at the Intersection of Love
When you reach the intersection, you can pretty much drive with your eyes closed (though we certainly don’t recommend doing that on any actual road trip). When you’re both in the same place emotionally and have the same idea of what it means to “arrive” then it’s almost as if your GPS has announced “Destination on left.”

Disclaimer: The blog team at UncommonGoods are not relationship experts. We don’t have degrees in interpersonal psychology, and the advice in this post probably shouldn’t be taken too seriously. However, we do sincerely hope you find your way to the intersection of love!


Intersection of Love | UncommonGoods

Design

Inspiration for Innovators: A New Collection of Patent Art

November 12, 2013

Creativity is one of our greatest joys and highest values at UncommonGoods. It makes us so happy when we come across or develop an imaginative, original design, artwork, or product that will bring something special into our customers’ lives. We’re in awe of the creative geniuses throughout history whose ideas, experiments, innovations and inventions have transformed life altogether.

Actress Susan Cabot as a chemist inventor Janice Starlin in the 1959 Roger Corman film, The Wasp WomanActress Susan Cabot as a chemist/inventor Janice Starlin in the 1959 Roger Corman film, The Wasp Woman

Learning about how great inventors and product designers have pursued their ideas from dream to reality, persisting through the grueling effort of iterative failures and breakthroughs, is incredibly inspiring. Our Product Development team wanted to create a new wall art collection that would link the often quiet presence of innovation in our daily lives to the grand and sometimes dramatic history of invention.

Thomas Edison with lightbulbThomas Edison looking stern while holding a light bulb

Thinking about history led them to the National Archives online collection. Then they had their light bulb moment. What’s a more universally-recognized symbol of inspiration than… the incandescent light bulb itself? What more prolific inventor has there been than Thomas Edison, with his 1,093 patents? And how cool is it that the National Archives collection includes some great-looking documents that were central to Edison’s most transformative inventions? (Answers: None, None, and Very.)

Edison Illuminated Art | UncommonGoods

Edison Illuminated Art (Electric-Lamp. U.S. Patent #223,898, 1880, by Thomas Edison)

The team fell in love with the patent application drawings that skilled draftsmen (yup, all men back then–though not all white men) created of the light bulb and other inventions. Their historical value is bottomless. But our team was also struck by their simple beauty, and the profound inspiration they recall and radiate. They decided to create a collection that would spotlight the elegant loveliness of these hand-drawn, hand-written documents.

Replica of Edison's Menlo Park LaboratoryReplica of Edison’s  Menlo Park Laboratory, site of the invention of the light bulb. (GNU Free Documentation License. Photo: Swampyank, Wikimedia Commons Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.)

It was determined that a Product Development team field trip to the Thomas Edison National Historical Park in West Orange, NJ, where “the wizard of Menlo Park” lived and laboratoried [Ed. note: We “innovated” that word] was a mandatory step in their creative process. [Ed. note: Uh-huh.]

Their trip to the wizard’s workshop wasn’t only inspiring; it was humbling. You know that famous Edison quote, “Genius is one percent inspiration and ninety-nine percent perspiration”? He wasn’t kidding. “The electric light has caused me the greatest amount of study and has required the most elaborate experiments,” Edison wrote. “Before I got through, I tested no fewer than 6,000 vegetable growths, and ransacked the world for the most suitable filament material.” (There was no electrical system for people to plug light bulbs into, so, no problemo, Edison invented a power distribution system, too.)

Edison bulb used in Menlo Park demo, 1879Edison bulb used in Menlo Park electric lamp demo, Christmas week, 1879. Unlike today’s bulbs, the early ones were created by artisans, of hand-blown glass. Photo: Sergio Caltagirone.

 

Edison 1877 cylinder phonograph - photo. Photo Library of CongressEdison’s 1877 cylinder phonograph

Edison’s 1879 light bulb – perhaps the most iconic patent ever – wasn’t actually the earliest; but it was the first efficient, long-lasting, practical, and commercially viable one. His 1877 cylinder phonograph, however, was an original. Even he was amazed when the first words he said into it – “Mary had a little lamb” – were played back to him by his machine.  (The little pocket device injecting music straight into your brain has Mary and her little lamb in its DNA. Even if you’re playing death metal.) [Ed. note: Whether or not you were fleeced is another issue. Har. Har.]

The patent applications for these inventions, antique as they are, still powerfully communicate passion for innovating, pushing forward, solving problems, imagining and designing the future. But there’s also an appealing quaintness to them. They seem to embody honest simplicity, even a kind of innocence.

Edison lightbulb quasi-ad
Edison the marketer: Electric light “warning,” 1878

Though we know these became some of the most successful products of all time (in part because Edison was a brilliant and aggressive marketer), because they’re purely technical, they seem to exist on a higher plane than mere marketing. There’s no slick, trendy styling; no scantily-clad ladies holding these objects; and no breathless ad copy. Invented before the onset of “planned obsolescence,” which created the problems of waste and resource depletion we have today, these products were designed to simply perform their functions well.

Phonograph Patent Art (U.S. Patent #227,679; 1880, by Thomas Edison)

We dig that. The team didn’t want to mess with perfection, so the artworks in our new collection consist of un-altered reproductions of the original patent applications, printed on 100% archival enhanced matte paper. Each goes a thought-provoking (and fun) step further by subtly incorporating functionality and form, to illustrate how these inventions have evolved. The Phonograph, for example, incorporates a vintage vinyl LP, and the Light Bulb is illuminated by an LED.

US Patent Office New Wing, 1891US Patent Office then-new wing, 1891

As Morgan Tanner, UncommonGoods Product Development Production Manager, put it, “These patents point to the origins of these commonplace items, but by no means represent the ‘last word’ on them. Innovation breathes life into the products we rely on and interact with every day. Reinvention brings timelessness.”

See Saw patent 116,502, 1871Sometimes inspiration means seeing things from a new angle. Seesaw Patent art (U.S. Patent #116,502, by Mrs. S. E. Saul, 1871)

The team hoped to dream up a collection of inspiring art for our customers that would honor creativity as an immensely powerful energy flowing through each and every of us–and they succeeded! The iconic, historical aura of these documents beams undimmed through the decades, motivating us each to explore our own, individual genius in whatever direction it takes us…even if it takes a while to get where we’re going, as it did for a certain young patent clerk at the beginning of the 20th century who couldn’t get a promotion and felt he was going nowhere at the speed of light.

Albert Einstein, patent clerk third class, Bern, Switzerland, c. 1903. He didn’t write the series of papers which revolutionized physics until 1905.

 

From a 1901 letter from Einstein’s father, Hermann, to Professor Wilhelm Ostwald at the University of Leipzig, Germany:
“I shall start by telling you that my son Albert is 22 years old, that … he feels profoundly unhappy with his present lack of position, and his idea that he has gone off the tracks with his career & is now out of touch gets more and more entrenched each day. In addition, he is oppressed by the thought that he is a burden on us, people of modest means…..” (Professor Ostwald never responded.)

The Uncommon Life

Uncommon Personalities: Meet Carolyn Topp

September 30, 2013
UncommonGoods Director of New Business and Product Development Carolyn Topp
Carolyn Topp, UncommonGoods Director of New Business and Product Development
My hometown is…
I grew up in Ardsley, NY, also home of the late great ice cream magnate Tom Carvel.

My favorite product we’ve developed at UncommonGoods is…
Always something new that will soon be in our assortment; this month it is “My Life Story – So Far.”

I’m inspired by…
Possibilities.

My guilty pleasure is…
I don’t believe in guilt.

An uncommon fact about me…
I was a cellist in Harry Alshin’s junior string orchestra (Westchester County, NY). We performed a concert at the Kennedy Center in Washington, DC (in the early 1970s) and each member of the orchestra was listed in the Congressional Record.

My favorite place to eat in New York City is (was)…
Florent– it represents a time and a place in NYC that no longer exists.

My style is…
My personal style is urban practical and classic.
My decorating style is eclectic – a mix of old and new, colorful, and comfortable for people and pets.

Working at UncommonGoods, I’ve learned…
Something new each day.

Would you rather… Spend a day on the set of Mad Men OR get front row seats and backstage passes at a Bruce Springsteen concert?
“You cannot be serious” (to quote John McEnroe) with this question. Bruce.